[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 1920

A RESEARCH ON BLOOD SUGAR IN DEPANCREATIZED DOGS

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1920;25(4):405-410. doi:10.1001/archinte.1920.00090330072003
Abstract

Recent experiments on the intravenous injection of epinephrin in normal dogs give rise to a question of considerable interest. If the injection of epinephrin causes a temporary hyperglycemia in normal animals, the blood sugar increasing shortly after injection, what would be the result in animals from which the pancreas has been removed? On this idea of investigation, these series of experiments were commenced. The intravenous injection of epinephrin in man has shown, in addition to a temporary hyperglycemia, in some cases a decrease in the output of carbon dioxid from the lungs, which supports the theory that epinephrin inhibits the combustion of sugar in the body, in opposition to the school that believes epinephrin increases the blood sugar by increasing the output of glycogen from the liver. At least, it seemed probable in undertaking this work that a relationship or antagonism might be determined between the pancreas and epinephrin toward

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×