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Article
February 1921

THE TENDENCY OF CARCINOMA OF THE PANCREAS TO SPREAD BY BLOODVASCULAR INVASION

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.

From the Pathologic Laboratory of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1921;27(2):175-183. doi:10.1001/archinte.1921.00100080038003
Abstract

Although carcinoma of the pancreas is a relatively uncommon disease, four cases of this condition have been found at necropsy at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital during a six months' period, including last winter. These cases represent one-half the number of such cases coming to necropsy in this laboratory since the opening of the hospital in 1913, the total being only eight cases. Study of the series shows that in three cases the head was involved primarily; in one case the head and body was involved, in three cases the cancer was diffuse throughout the organ, and in one case it was limited to the tail. Two of the carcinomas were of the scirrhus type, five were adenocarcinomas and one, composed of atypical cells, was interpreted as having arisen from the islands of Langerhans rather than from ducts or parenchyma.

Extensive metastasis occurred in six of the eight cases, a

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