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July 1921

II. THE EFFECT OF CYANIDS AND OF ORGANIC OXIDIZING AGENTS ON THE LIVER INJURY CAUSED BY CHLOROFORM

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

From the George Williams Hooper Foundation for Medical Research, University of California Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1921;28(1):20-36. doi:10.1001/archinte.1921.00100130025002
Abstract

The series of experiments here recorded were undertaken with the hope of throwing some light on the etiology of chloroform liver necrosis. Should this liver injury be caused by a reduction of tissue oxidation, it is conceivable that the cyanids, which apparently act by preventing oxidation, might increase the damage to be expected from chloroform if the two drugs were given simultaneously. On the other hand, iodozo-and iodoxy-benzoic acids and their sodium salts, which readily give up oxygen to the tissues, might lessen the expected injury.1

We have already reported a few experiments in which potassium cyanid was administered intravenously, either alone or in conjunction with prolonged chloroform anesthesia.2 Although large doses of the drug itself produce an extensive fatty alteration in the liver parenchyma, smaller amounts, given during the administration of chloroform, affect the liver changes produced by the anesthetic very little, if at all.

Experimental work by Verworn3

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