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November 1921

THE INFLUENCE OF INORGANIC IRON ON THE REGENERATION OF BLOOD AFTER HEMORRHAGIC ANEMIA

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Department of Research Medicine, University of Pennsylvania.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1921;28(5):638-648. doi:10.1001/archinte.1921.00100170139009
Abstract

The controversy over the therapeutic effect of inorganic iron has raged for several centuries, in fact, very considerably has it occupied the minds of medical men since Menghis, in 1746, reported that he had found iron in the blood of man. This controversy continued up until the past fifteen years, when Abderhalden, in 1906, abandoned his contention that iron could not be converted into hemoglobin. Since, then, it has been very generally accepted that inorganic iron is converted into hemoglobin as is the iron in the food and the so called organic iron. A re-opening of this controversy might be said to have occurred last year, when Whipple1 and his co-workers published their studies on the regeneration of the blood after anemia. In one of this series of papers they show that ordinary inorganic iron in the form of Blaud's pills has little or no effect on blood regeneration without

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