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Article
December 1921

A STUDY OF SIGNIFICANT CHEMICAL CHANGES IN THE BLOOD COINCIDENT WITH MALIGNANT TUMORS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Laboratory of Pathological Chemistry and Department of Medicine, New York Postgraduate Medical School and Hospital, New York City.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1921;28(6):813-826. doi:10.1001/archinte.1921.00100180131008
Abstract

In 1897 Schopp and Moraczewski1 concluded from their studies on urine that the development of carcinomatous growths in the human organism was characterized by a retention of nitrogen. This minus balance was attributed to an increased demand for nitrogen by the malignant tumor. More recent chemical studies on the blood in malignancy, while confirming this observation, have at the same time proffered a different interpretation of the nitrogen retention. The most comprehensive analyses of the blood in malignancy have been placed on record within the last year by Theis and Stone.2 Their studies included observations on the nonprotein, urea and amino-acid nitrogen, and the uric acid and sugar in a series of 189 cases, representing a wide range of type and location of malignant neoplasms. They have reported subnormal values for nonprotein and urea nitrogen, particularly in the rapidly growing tumors of the breast and uterus, and an amino-acid nitrogen

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