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Article
January 1922

OBSERVATIONS FOLLOWING INTRAVENOUS INJECTIONS OF HYPERTONIC SALT SOLUTIONS IN CASES OF NEUROSYPHILIS

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Medical Service of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1922;29(1):72-81. doi:10.1001/archinte.1922.00110010077006
Abstract

INTRODUCTORY  Weed and McKibben1 and others2 have shown that the administration of hypertonic salt solutions in the cat causes a marked and prolonged fall in cerebrospinal fluid pressure. By an ingenious method they were further able to show that with this fall in pressure a considerable amount of subarachnoid fluid was dislocated into the nervous system; that the fluid "passed along the perivasculars into the substance of the nervous system, reaching the interfibrous spaces in the white matter and the pericellular spaces in the gray." The method leading to these conclusions consisted in allowing a few cubic centimeters of iron-ammonium citrate and sodium ferrocyanid to run into the subarachnoid space as the cerebrospinal fluid pressure (after intravenous injection of hypertonic salt solution) reached zero or was rapidly falling; then fixation of the central nervous system in liquor formaldehyd acidified with 5 per cent. hydrochloric acid precipitated Prussian blue (readily demonstrable

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