[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.161.130.145. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 1922

AN EFFICIENT AND PRACTICAL METHOD FOR THE COUNTING OF RED BLOOD CELLS

Author Affiliations

MONTREAL

From the Pathological Laboratories of the Royal Victoria Hospital and of McGill University.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1922;30(2):216-220. doi:10.1001/archinte.1922.00110080086005
Abstract

Dreyer has quite recently described a method for the enumeration of blood cells and bacteria without the use of a counting chamber. His method simulates that first elaborated by Wright for the counting of bacteria in that it is dependent for its determination on a comparison of the relative number of corpuscles, which are of known titer per unit volume, and the elements to be counted. It differs principally, however, and has a much broader field of usefulness in that, instead of using normal erythrocytes and making smears for examination, a suspension of the red corpuscles of the hen carefully titered is used as a standard and this suspension mixed in known proportion with the elements, i.e. patient's erythrocytes, leukocytes, etc., to be counted allows for examination and comparative enumeration under the microscope. He points out the following distinct advantages: (1) it can be used with equal facility for counting

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×