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Article
January 1923

ON THE TECHNIC OF THE DETERMINATION OF THE VELOCITY OF THE ARTERIAL PULSE WAVE

Author Affiliations

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK

From the Medical Clinic of the University of Copenhagen.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1923;31(1):56-62. doi:10.1001/archinte.1923.00110130059005
Abstract

As early as the third century B. C., there was a conception in Greek medicine (Erasistratus) that the pulse in the parts of the body nearest the heart appeared earlier than at the extremities. This conception seems to have been forgotten until 1734, when it was emphasized again by Weitbrecht.1 The first to measure the time difference in the appearance of the pulse in the central and the more peripheral arteries was E. H. Weber,2 in 1850. Weber used palpation of the pulse, and took the time on an ordinary watch. He found by this means that the pulse wave in the dorsal artery of the foot appeared later than the pulse wave in the external maxillary artery. A few years after that, Vierodt,3 in Germany, and Marey,4 in France, introduced the sphygmograph. In 1861, Buisson5 did the first determinations of the velocity of the pulse wave by means of

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