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Article
January 1923

HIPPURIC ACID SYNTHESIS AS A TEST OF RENAL FUNCTION

Author Affiliations

OMAHA

From the Department of Biochemistry and the Medical Service of the University Hospital, Nebraska University College of Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1923;31(1):116-144. doi:10.1001/archinte.1923.00110130119011
Abstract

The worth of an organ is measured by its capacity to perform the daily task, in other words, by its physiologic efficiency. This idea of the fundamental importance of the patency of the organ underlies the many attempts to discover means of assaying the functional capacity of the affected organ. The kidney, on whose integrity an individual's welfare depends to a large extent, has been the object of the greatest number of functional tests. The tests most in vogue in clinical medicine fall into several groups depending on the particular task which each purports to present to the kidney. One of the most commonly employed tests is concerned with the ability of the kidney to rid the body of a foreign body, such as the dye phenolsulphonephthalein.1 Others attempt to place the kidney under an increased strain in performing its excretory function, by increasing very greatly the amount of sodium

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