[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 1923

THE CORRELATION OF VITAL CAPACITY WITH STEM HEIGHT

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

From the Department of Medicine, Stanford University.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1923;31(3):342-344. doi:10.1001/archinte.1923.00110150041002
Abstract

The vital capacities of normal men vary with their sizes. The measurement of size which furnishes the best standard for estimating the normal vital capacity is, however, still under discussion. In a recent study of male students at Stanford University,1 a comparison was made between vital capacity, on the one hand, and the height, the weight, and certain combinations of height and weight on the other. The stem heights of these students were not measured; and since Dreyer places the highest value on stem height in estimating the normal vital capacity, the present study was undertaken for the purpose of comparing stem height with standing height as a vital capacity standard for normal young men.

Observations were made on 400 male students at Stanford University, whose ages ranged between 18 and 30 years. The standing heights were measured in bare feet and the stem heights were measured according to the

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×