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April 1923

DISTRIBUTION OF SUGAR IN WHOLE BLOOD, PLASMA AND CORPUSCLES; PERMEABILITY OF RED BLOOD CORPUSCLES FOR SUGAR IN DIABETIC AND NONDIABETIC CASES

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND

From the Cleveland Clinic.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1923;31(4):555-566. doi:10.1001/archinte.1923.00110160102006
Abstract

A study of the literature pertaining to the distribution of sugar in the blood shows a decided divergence of opinion among different investigators.

Tachau1 found that there was always a higher percentage of sugar in plasma and a smaller percentage of sugar in the corpuscles than in whole blood. In a report of their work on the permeability of the red blood corpuscles to sugar, Gradwohl and Blaivas2 make the following statement: "When the alimentary hyperglycemia begins and sugar is thrown into the circulation in increased quantity, it is first dissolved in plasma and penetrates the corpuscles secondarily. As the hyperglycemia declines, the sugar content of the plasma goes down and the corpuscles then throw their sugar in excess into the plasma. Tachau attempts to explain by this line of reasoning why it is that in the presence of a declining hyperglycemia of alimentary origin the serum loses its sugar

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