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June 1923

A STUDY OF MACROPHAGES IN THE HUMAN BLOOD WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THEIR PRESENCE IN TWO CASES OF SUBACUTE BACTERIAL ENDOCARDITIS

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

From the Departments of Medicine and Anatomy of the University of California Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1923;31(6):830-846. doi:10.1001/archinte.1923.00110180049004
Abstract

It is the purpose of this paper to present two cases of malignant endocarditis associated with Streptococcus uiridans septicemia, showing some unusual cells termed macrophages in the peripheral blood. The morphologic and functional characteristics of these cells corresponded closely with cells produced experimentally in rabbits by one of us.1 It is because of this similarity that we hope to offer some suggestions which may help to clarify the nature and relationship of these and other mononuclear cells found in the blood.

The cells which we term macrophages (Metchinkoff, H. M. Evans) because one of their striking characteristics is a marked power of phagocytosis, have been synonomously termed pyrrhol cells (Goldman), adventitia cells (Marchand), histogenous macrophages (F. A. Evans), histiocytes (Aschoff, Kiyono), resting wandering or polyblast cells (Maximow), rhagiocrine cells (Renaut), endothelial leukocytes (Mallory), and clasmatocytes (Ranvier), although some of the above terms included in their scope additional mononuclear cells to

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