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Article
January 1924

COMPARISON OF CONSTANTS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF VITAL CAPACITY

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1924;33(1):118-127. doi:10.1001/archinte.1924.00110250121011
Abstract

Since 1917 there has been a general revival of interest in the study of vital capacity, as first brought forth by Hutchinson,1 of England, in 1846. This renewed interest is primarily due to the thorough work of Peabody and Wentworth,2 of this country, and Dreyer,3 of England. The literature on the subject since 1917 has become extensive, both from the clinical and investigative aspect, and has been chiefly concerned with the determination of what the normal capacity should be for a given person. Many methods have been advocated as being best suited for the determination of the standard capacity, and there are almost as many different formulas as authors on the subject. Hutchinson attempted to show that the standard vital capacity varied directly with the height of the person. More recently Peabody and Wentworth have studied the problem of vital capacity, and have classified persons into groups according to their

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