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Article
May 1924

PARADOXICAL SHORTENING OF THE COAGULATION TIME OF THE BLOOD AFTER INTRAVENOUS ADMINISTRATION OF SODIUM CITRATE

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1924;33(5):535-546. doi:10.1001/archinte.1924.00110290002001
Abstract

Sodium citrate renders blood incoagulable when the two are mixed in proper proportions in the test tube. Because of its well-known anticoagulant action, it was first employed for blood transfusions in this country by Lewisohn1 and by Weil,2 and abroad by Hustin3 and Agote.4

In 1915, while working with Lewisohn1 on some of the preliminary experimental work, one of us (G. B.) observed a remarkable and apparently paradoxical shortening of the coagulation time of the blood in human beings and dogs following transfusion of the citrated blood. The effect was strikingly brought out in one of these experiments. Blood taken from a dog before a citrate transfusion showed a clotting time of five minutes. Three hundred cubic centimeters of blood was then removed and mixed with 5 c.c. of 10 per cent. sodium citrate solution and reinjected into the jugular vein of the same dog. Blood taken at intervals of

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