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June 1924

THE EFFECT OF AMYL NITRITE, BLEEDING AND EPINEPHRIN ON THE BLOOD PRESSURE AND THE SIZE OF THE CAT'S HEART

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Medical Clinic of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital and the Department of Medicine of the Harvard Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1924;33(6):738-741. doi:10.1001/archinte.1924.00110300081003
Abstract

The experiments described in this paper were undertaken with an idea of comparing the relative changes in heart size and blood pressure which occur during vasoconstriction, vasodilatation and bleeding. It is known that the intravenous injection of epinephrin causes a sharp rise in the arterial blood pressure due largely to vasoconstriction.1 It is known also that the nitrites cause a rapid fall in blood pressure due to a vasodilatation by direct action on the blood vessels.2 Meek and Eyster,3 in carefully controlled roentgen-ray studies on dogs found that there was a reduction in the blood pressure and diastolic size of the heart after a hemorrhage amounting to about 2 per cent, of the body weight. Meyer4 has shown by roentgen ray that hearts of rabbits decrease in size after bleeding. He reported a case of marked diminution in the heart outline following hemorrhage, with a gradual return to normal after

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