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Article
October 1924

THE CONCENTRATING CAPACITY OF THE KIDNEY

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

From the Department of Medicine of Stanford University Medical School, San Francisco.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1924;34(4):462-480. doi:10.1001/archinte.1924.00120040048004
Abstract

A capacity for concentration must be conceded to the kidney, because most of the substances which it excretes are found to be in a state of higher concentration in the urine than in the plasma. The mechanism through which this concentration is accomplished cannot easily be conceived of as a process in which the kidney remains passive. It seems necessary to postulate that work is done by the renal tissue in converting a dilute plasma solution into a relatively concentrated urinary solution. On this account there has always been a special interest attached to observations dealing with the manner in which such an active function is affected by changes in the environment and structure of the kidney, though it must be admitted that there is as yet no unanimity of opinion regarding the factors which influence the renal concentrating capacity, nor any clear conception as to the method by which

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