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October 1924

THE PRESENT STATUS OF THE QUESTION OF THE LENGTH OF LIFE OF THE UNAGGLUTINABLE TRANSFUSED RED BLOOD CORPUSCLE

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1924;34(4):481-489. doi:10.1001/archinte.1924.00120040067005
Abstract

Isaacs,1 in a recent publication from the Harvard Medical School and allied hospitals, has presented data which apparently establish a new and much needed means of identifying young red blood corpuscles. These cells which appear in the circulation after transfusion, can be distinguished by their content of one or more of four kinds of granules, of which the most important appears to be a comparatively large, nonstaining refractile body. Isaacs has also quantitatively correlated the occurrence of granular and reticulated corpuscles to the presence of cells nonagglutinable with serum, containing isoagglutinins against the majority of the native cells of the circulation in question. So far as Isaacs' work concerns itself with the significance of the cells containing the refractile granule, I predict that it may prove a valuable contribution, but with respect to his conclusions concerning the tenure of life of the unagglutinable transfused corpuscle I do not agree.

Isaacs

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