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Article
November 1924

THE INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT KINDS OF OIL, INTRODUCED INTO THE RECTUM, ON GASTRIC SECRETION

Author Affiliations

BATTLE CREEK, MICH.

From the Pawlow Physiological Institute of the Battle Creek Sanitarium.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1924;34(5):726-734. doi:10.1001/archinte.1924.00120050143010
Abstract

For many years in his clinical work one of us (K.) noticed that different kinds of oil, when introduced into the rectum of a patient in the evening had a harmful effect on digestion the next day; with a lack of appetite, heavy stomach, coated tongue and other symptoms of gastric disorder. He concluded from this that gastric secretion is inhibited by such a use of oils. The experiments of Pawlow1 and his pupils (Lobasoff,2 Virshubsky,3 Sokoloff4 and others) have proved that oils are inhibitors of gastric secretion, and that the inhibition has its origin in the mucosa of the small intestine.

Kellogg5 explained the mechanism of this inhibiting effect, in the patients observed by him, by the following fact, which had been noted and proved in this clinic by Case.6 It was found that with the roentgen ray one could frequently observe rapid and numerous reverse movements of the

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