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Article
January 1925

OBSERVATIONS ON A CENTRIPETAL VENOUS PULSE IN MAN

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS

From the Physiological Department of Washington University.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1925;35(1):124-128. doi:10.1001/archinte.1925.00120070129008
Abstract

If one seals a glass capsule over a superficial vein on the back of the hand and applies to this capsule an air pressure a few millimeters of water lower than the minimum pressure required to produce complete collapse of the vein, a distinct pulsation of the vein with each heart beat will be seen in a certain number of subjects. That this pulse is not transmitted directly back from the heart, as is the jugular pulse, is shown by the fact that the pulse persists after compression of the vein just central to the capsule. The pulsations are abolished by compression of the vein just peripheral to the capsule. It would appear that we are dealing with a pulse passing from the arteries through the capillaries and venules into the larger veins. With this idea in mind, certain procedures calculated to modify the extent to which a pulse could

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