[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.87.114.118. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 1925

THE INFLUENCE OF FOOD INTAKE ON THE ENZYMATIC CONCENTRATION OF HUMAN INTESTINAL CONTENTS OBTAINED FROM A DUODENAL FISTULA

Author Affiliations

NEW ORLEANS

From the Department of Medicine and the Laboratory of Physiologic Chemistry of the Tulane University of Louisiana School of Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1925;35(3):357-361. doi:10.1001/archinte.1925.00120090070005
Abstract

The rapidly increasing use of the duodenal tube has also greatly increased the need of practical chemical methods for the examination of duodenal contents, and as a result several systems have been described.1 Of these methods, we have had most experience with the technic of McClure, Wetmore and Reynolds,1 which was selected for this purpose because it appeared to us to be based on methods which had been carefully and scientifically tested out in other lines of work.

Two points operate against the practical application of the methods of examination of duodenal contents described by McClure and his collaborators. One of these is that the reagents used in the preparation of the substrate either are difficult to secure or are of varying composition. These authors recommend for this purpose an emulsion of cottonseed oil prepared by the Walker-Gordon Company of Boston, a preparation of paracasein (the soluble casein of Van

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×