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Article
June 1925

THE ELECTROCARDIOGRAM AND BLOOD PRESSURE DURING SURGICAL OPERATION AND CONVALESCENCEEFFECT OF ROUTINE PREOPERATIVE DIGITALIZATION

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, and the New Haven Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1925;35(6):782-795. doi:10.1001/archinte.1925.00120120113010
Abstract

The influence of preoperative digitalization on the incidence of post-operative complications and deaths due to "circulatory failure" is a matter of considerable interest to most surgeons, but one which has apparently received little systematic investigation. A number of observers advocate the routine employment of the drug in certain types of cases or operations, and feel that it is of undoubted value. Thus, Lilienthal,1 in discussing resection of the lung for suppurative infections, says:

With or without sepsis, it is the power of the heart to adapt itself which is perhaps the greatest factor in determining resistance. While this is practically so in all surgery, it appears to be more striking in resection of the infected lung . . . In any event, digitalization should be accomplished in the forty-eight hours preceding operation.

Similarly, Thomas,2 in his discussion of the factors responsible for mortality after prostatectomy, says:

For years I have

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