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Article
October 1925

BLOOD AND SYMPTOMATIC CHANGES FOLLOWING THE INTRAVENOUS ADMINISTRATION OF A VARIETY OF AGENTS AND SOLUTIONS

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

From the Department of Pharmacology, Stanford University School of Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1925;36(4):447-506. doi:10.1001/archinte.1925.00120160003001
Abstract

The object of this study was to observe the changes in composition and appearance of the blood occurring immediately after the intravenous injection of a variety of agents. These included some that cause anaphylactoid reactions in animals and some that are exploited for therapeutic purposes in human subjects. In this way, additional information regarding the effects of intravenous injections could be secured, and the hypothesis of hemoclasis or colloidoclasis, that is to say, disturbances in physical and chemical mechanisms of the blood and tissues, as the explanation of the changes and reactions could be tested. The analysis of blood was limited to the more important constituents and changes that might accompany such states as collapse, anoxemia, asphyxia, intravascular coagulation and thrombosis, which occur in varying degrees during the acute reactions from many agents injected intravenously. These have been described previously by several investigators. The literature of the subject has been

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