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Article
February 1926

INTRADERMAL SALT SOLUTION TEST IN CARDIAC DISEASE IN CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

SEATTLE

From the Otho S. A. Sprague Memorial Institute Laboratory of the Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1926;37(2):281-290. doi:10.1001/archinte.1926.00120200131012
Abstract

In 1923 McClure and Aldrich1 reported that when 0.2 c.c. of an 0.8 per cent, aqueous solution of sodium chlorid was injected intradermally in children, the resulting elevation disappeared or became impalpable much sooner in edematous patients than in certain control patients without edema. Shortening of the disappearance time in edematous patients, while most marked in regions of palpable edema, was also found, to a less degree, in areas in which pitting could not be demonstrated. This report included three cases of children with cardiac disease, in each of which the disappearance time was shorter in the leg than in the arm. In a subsequent paper the same authors2 reported the results of the application of the test in sixteen children having nephritis, with generalized edema. They pointed out that the decreased disappearance time found in remotely separated regions of the body in the same subject could be explained on

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