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Article
February 1926

EXCRETION OF PHENOLSULPHONEPHTHALEIN IN OBSTRUCTIVE JAUNDICE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the medical department of the Mount Sinai Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1926;37(2):291-296. doi:10.1001/archinte.1926.00120200141013
Abstract

Whatever the manner in which the normal kidney performs its functions of excreting water, salt, nitrogenous products and foreign dyestuffs like phenolsulphonephthalein, there is not much question that when the kidneys are diseased there is often dissociation of these functions. The importance of the ability of the kidney to excrete phenolsulphonephthalein is particularly emphasized by those cases in which there is a marked diminution of dye excretion while the blood nitrogen figures are normal, or at the upper limit of normal, with the water excretion undiminished. Without discussing the clinical syndromes giving rise to these combinations of expressions of kidney function (not of kidney morphology), it will be assumed that the rate of excretion of phenolsulphonephthalein is one criterion of renal function.1 And when there is evidence of dysfunction, one method that may aid in estimating diminution of function is the dye excretion.

That there is a relationship between obstructive

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