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Article
March 1926

THE VALUE OF A STARCH-IODIN REACTION AS A TEST OF PANCREATIC FUNCTION

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the gastro-intestinal clinic of the hospital of the Graduate School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1926;37(3):431-439. doi:10.1001/archinte.1926.00120210136009
Abstract

In 1924 Bassler devised a test for determining pancreatic function. With a view to establishing the practicability of this test and its adaptability for clinical purposes, this work was begun. We soon observed such marked variations in the results obtained by varying one of the reagents that we were led to undertake a detailed investigation of the test itself and of the various factors entering into it.

The Bassler test is presumably a test for pancreatic amylase and is designed to determine quantitatively that enzyme alone. In order to be of value as an index of pancreatic function this test presupposes the nondissociation of pancreatic enzymes; that is, if one enzyme is decreased the others are assumed to be proportionately diminished. This point is still far from settled. Against this nondissociation view may be cited the conclusions of Pawlow,1 that the kind of food eaten calls forth an increase in

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