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Article
August 1926

THE RELATION OF MONILIA TO INFECTIONS OF THE UPPER AIR PASSAGES

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS

From the Department of Bacteriology and Hygiene, St. Louis University School of Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1926;38(2):217-221. doi:10.1001/archinte.1926.00120260075006
Abstract

The occurrence of yeasts or yeastlike organisms in the respiratory tract of normal or sick persons is by no means an unrecognized occurrence. It has long been accepted that fungi (named usually as monilia or endomyces) are agents in the causation of thrush. In recent years reports have appeared in increasing numbers concerning the presence of fungi in affections of the upper air passages of man. It has been shown by a number of observers that fungi can be found in the upper air passages of normal persons, and also, possibly as secondary invaders, in the air passages of persons suffering from infections apparently primarily due to some bacterial agent.1 The presence of fungi, generally of the class of the imperfect fungi, has been demonstrated in a number of cases of bronchitis; such cases have been reported from various parts of the world but principally from the tropics.2 And, finally,

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