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Article
August 1926

CORONARY THROMBOSIS WITH CONGENITAL ABSENCE OF THE LEFT CORONARY ARTERY

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1926;38(2):222-225. doi:10.1001/archinte.1926.00120260080007
Abstract

The clinical features of coronary obstruction are fairly generally known. The character and distribution of the pain associated with definite changes in the cardiac findings constitute a clinical picture that is rarely unrecognized by those familiar with the condition. This case is of particular interest because of the congenital absence of the left coronary artery.

REPORT OF CASE 

History.  —S. B., a man, aged 46, was admitted to the University Hospital, May 26, 1925. He complained of severe pain over the lower sternal region and shortness of breath. He stated that he had been working in a stone quarry and was obliged to push cars filled with stone. While pushing a car the day prior to entering the hospital, he was suddenly seized by a severe pain over the lower anterior chest which appeared to be beneath the sternum. The pain was so severe that he was compelled to stop

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