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Article
April 1927

HYPERTENSION IN PREGNANCYRELATION OF THE CALCIUM CONTENT OF THE BLOOD TO THE ETIOLOGY

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the medical clinic of the Chicago Lying-In Hospital and Dispensary, aided by a grant from the Mothers' Aid Society.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1927;39(4):465-474. doi:10.1001/archinte.1927.00130040003001
Abstract

A thorough analysis of the theories of the etiology of hypertension will not be undertaken in this article. In all probability the etiology of vascular disease varies in different cases and is the result of a combination of insults to the circulatory apparatus.1 With the field limited to the hypertensions occurring in pregnancy, still another set of theories has been evolved,2 the gist of which is the view that hypertension in pregnancy is a manifestation of the reaction to an intoxication. The exact nature and source of the toxemia is still unknown.3

Lange4 and others,5 and more recently Strouse and Daly,6 have emphasized the importance of thyroid intoxications in pregnancy. That the parathyroid glands should be similarly upset is not unlikely. It is well known that in parathyroprivia an increased muscular tone is evident.7 Associated with this phenomenon is a lowered concentration of calcium in the blood, first pointed out

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