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April 1927

Schistosomiasis vel Bilharziasis.

Author Affiliations

By C. G. Kay Sharp, M.D., with a foreword by J. B. Christopherson, C.M.G., M.D. Price, $2.75. Pp. 74. New York: William Wood & Company, 1925.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1927;39(4):601-602. doi:10.1001/archinte.1927.00130040139012

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Schistosomiasis, the proper title for the condition formerly included under the name bilharziasis, is fortunately rare in North America, but in Asia and Africa it is still a formidable disease. As Dr. Christopherson says, it is one of the great endemic diseases of the world, and anything that will emphasize the importance of the parasites and their effects in the minds of the public should aid in the control of the infestation. The work under review admirably answers the needs. Dr. Sharp gives a brief but adequate historical account. Bilharz deserves credit for the discovery, and the reason his name is no longer applied to the disease is that some time before Cobbold proposed it, Weilland had named the genus as now recognized by zoologists.

Three disease groups are caused by these trematodes: urinary schistosomiasis, due to Schistosoma hematobium; intestinal schistosomiasis due to S. mansoni, and schistosomiasis of the Far

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