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Article
May 1927

CONGENITAL VENTRICULAR SEPTAL DEFECT IN A MAN, AGED SEVENTY-NINE

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Medical Service of Dr. S. Solis Cohen, Jewish Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1927;39(5):705-709. doi:10.1001/archinte.1927.00130050102009
Abstract

Ventricular septal defects are usually situated just beneath the aortic cusps, anterior to the undefended space, and are frequently associated with other anomalies, such as pulmonary stenosis and dextroposition of the aorta. Rarely do they occur alone. The following case is unique in the peculiar location and large size of a congenital ventricular septal defect unassociated with other anomalies. The age of the patient and the absence of cardiac symptoms other than a terminal cyanosis are additional features of interest.

REPORT OF CASE 

History.  —H. F., a white man, aged 79, an inmate of the Old Folks Home of the Jewish Hospital, whose chief complaint was stomach trouble, was admitted to the medical ward in the service of Dr. S. Solis Cohen, May 4, 1926. His family history was unimportant. At the age of 40 he had had typhoid fever, and at the age of 40 he had had typhoid

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