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February 1928

THE EFFECT OF TOXEMIA ON TOLERANCE FOR DEXTROSE

Author Affiliations

DALLAS, TEXAS

From the Departments of Internal Medicine and Physiology, Baylor University College of Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1928;41(2):257-263. doi:10.1001/archinte.1928.00130140119009
Abstract

The fact that toxemias, from whatever origin, cause a disturbance in the tolerance for dextrose of laboratory animals or human beings has been definitely established. This has been noted clinically and experimentally. Clinically, it is illustrated by the much feared infections of diabetic patients. The effect is that of producing a delay in the removal of dextrose from the blood stream or, in other words, a decreased tolerance. The exact explanation of this phenomenon is lacking. Lawrence and Buckley,1 judging from a series of experiments on rabbits intoxicated with diphtheria toxin, are of the opinion that it is due to a glycogenolysis produced by a stimulation of the "thyroid adrenal apparatus." Tisdall and his co-workers,2 experimenting with puppies intoxicated with diphtheria toxin and histamine, do not come to any definite conclusion regarding the explanation of this phenomenon. They feel that intoxication may produce its effect on the tolerance for sugar

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