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Article
February 1928

INFLUENCE OF POSTURE ON PHENOLSULPHONPHTHALEIN TEST FOR KIDNEY FUNCTION

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Physiology Laboratory of the University of Chicago.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1928;41(2):279-291. doi:10.1001/archinte.1928.00130140141011
Abstract

Studies on the so-called functional albuminuria, also variously designated as cyclic, intermittent, physiologic, orthostatic, etc., first focused attention on posture as a factor in renal activity. Naturally, the criterion most often used in the earlier works on this subject was the appearance of albumin in the urine. The volume of urine excreted in different body postures had been recorded by some investigators only as subsidiary observations. Edel1 noted decreased urine volume during the standing posture coincident with the maximum albuminuria and, conversely, an increased volume on the assuming of a recumbent posture when albumin disappeared from the urine. Linnoisier and Lemoine2 studied the influence of posture on renal activity by making twelve hour observations on renal and albuminuric patients. Notwithstanding the lack of adequate control of diet and water intake, they could observe a definite decrease, not only of the urine, but of urea and chlorides, during standing, as compared

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