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Article
April 1928

A RECORD SYSTEM SUITABLE FOR BOTH CLINICAL AND STATISTICAL MEDICINE

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Department of Biometry and Vital Statistics, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, no. 133, and from the Department of Medicine, University of Maryland.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1928;41(4):499-535. doi:10.1001/archinte.1928.00130160049004
Abstract

Notation of clinical observations has existed since the beginning of medicine. A large portion of the present knowledge of disease has come from the summation of the bedside notes made by the physician. Before the occurrence of comparatively recent scientific trends in modern laboratory medicine, the clinical record might well have been considered as the corner-stone on which all medical knowledge was built.

In the past three decades the basic medical sciences have advanced with tremendous strides. The microscope and the test tube have yielded scientific facts of utmost importance. The knowledge obtained from observation made at the bedside has progressed with the advance in laboratory medicine but has scarcely kept pace with it. This is due, in part at least, to the ignorance displayed by the clinical group in modern statistical technic. The analysis of clinical records, which is the scientific proving ground for clinical observation, has been carried

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