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Article
October 1928

THE PREVENTION OF EXPERIMENTAL EXUDATES BY THE PARATHYROID HORMONE (COLLIP)

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Pharmacology, Cornell University Medical College.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1928;42(4):576-578. doi:10.1001/archinte.1928.00130210124011
Abstract

The view is commonly held that calcium salts inhibit the formation of effusions. The literature dealing with the experimental work on this subject seems to indicate that calcium is extremely effective for that purpose. It has not proved so in clinical practice in the manner in which the calcium salts are generally given. In a previous paper,1 I described experiments that confirm the view that the calcium salts inhibit the formation of experimental exudates and pointed out some of the limitations that might readily vitiate the clinical usefulness of this antagonism. From that study, it appeared evident that the absolute inhibitory effect of the calcium salts is rather limited; that it depends on the dose of calcium and the intensity of the irritation; that an extremely large dose of calcium is necessary to inhibit the effects of moderate irritation, and that the effect of more intense irritation is practically uninfluenced

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