December 1928


Author Affiliations


From the Department of Pathology, Loyola University School of Medicine, and the Laboratories of Mercy Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1928;42(6):893-900. doi:10.1001/archinte.1928.00130230095008

In 1922, Schultz1 described a series of cases of a peculiar type of necrosing angina accompanied by a marked absolute and especially granulocytic leukopenia. He asserted that these symptoms were manifestations of a specific disease which he called "agranulocytosis." Since that time, numerous reports of similar cases, at present about 125, have appeared in the literature designated as agranulocytosis or agranulocytic angina (Friedemann2). The results of an investigation of 5 cases of agranulocytosis observed between November, 1927, and April, 1928, and a careful and critical study of a large number of records of agranulocytoses induced me to present a discussion of the symptomatology, pathology and differential diagnosis of this disease, because, in my opinion, the term "agranulocytosis" is in a number of cases applied to conditions which differ distinctly from those for which Schultz introduced this name. The following description of the clinical and pathologic aspects of the disease was

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview