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Article
December 1928

THE EFFECTS OF SERUMS FROM NORMAL AND FROM ANEMIC PERSONS ON THE GROWTH OF SEEDLINGS

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH.

From the Simpson Memorial Institute for Medical Research, Ann Arbor, and the Department of Plant Physiology of the University of Michigan.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1928;42(6):909-915. doi:10.1001/archinte.1928.00130230111010
Abstract

The impetus given to the study of pernicious anemia by the discovery of Minot and Murphy1 that a remission could be induced and maintained by a diet rich in liver or an effective liver extract has reopened several problems in connection with the disease. The presence of toxic substances in the blood stream as an etiologic factor has been considered by Macht2 although, as Minot pointed out,1 these substances could be a result of the altered metabolism produced by the disease rather than a causative factor. In a series of studies on the effect of serums taken from patients with pernicious anemia and other serums on the growth of lupine seedlings, Macht3 found that the average coefficient of growth in Shive's solution which contained normal blood serum was 75 per cent of the growth of the seedlings as compared with similar growth in Shive's solution alone. On the other hand,

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