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Article
June 1929

PEPTIC ULCERA STUDY OF FIVE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-SIX CASES

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Medical Clinic of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1929;43(6):846-873. doi:10.1001/archinte.1929.00130290117007
Abstract

The past twenty years have witnessed a considerable advance in the knowledge of peptic ulcer. Credit for this is due chiefly to roentgenologists, who not only have simplified the diagnosis but have led to a better understanding of the pathologic physiology and complications of the disease. Therapy, especially surgical measures, likewise has improved. Diagnosis is made earlier, and most of the end-stages which occur when the ulcer is allowed to run its course are avoided. Yet the fundamental facts concerning peptic ulcer still are shrouded in mystery. There is much difference of opinion concerning the etiology, the cause and the nature of the symptoms. As long as this is so, there can be no unanimity of opinion regarding treatment.

Much of the disagreement on therapy depends also on the meager amount of statistical information in the voluminous literature on peptic ulcer. Many papers deal with the effect of a single

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