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Article
August 1929

THE RELATION OF WITHDRAWAL OF CEREBROSPINAL FLUID TO THE BODY TEMPERATURE: CONSIDERATION OF A THERMOREGULATORY CENTERA STUDY OF TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY CASES

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1929;44(2):263-271. doi:10.1001/archinte.1929.00140020111009
Abstract

During the course of routine examinations of the spinal fluid in neuropsychiatric patients, the following peculiarity was observed, at first accidentally: Shortly after lumbar punctures, a few patients complained of general discomfort. This circumstance led the nurses in attendance to take the temperatures of these patients. They found a slight elevation. Interested by this incidental observation, I decided to pursue this investigation further and thus commenced to gather observations on a large scale. The observations on 250 cases presented here suggest certain ideas concerning the pathogenesis of fever and the possible localization of a thermoregulatory center. The observations in adults differ somewhat from those in children. The adult group consisted of twenty-five patients with hemiplegia, five with increased intracranial pressure, seventeen with idiopathic epilepsy, ten with meningitis, forty with psychoneuroses, twelve with manic-depressive psychosis, ten with transverse myelitis, two with multiple sclerosis, fifteen with paresis, twenty with tabes, forty with

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