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December 1929

HEMOCHROMATOSIS IN A METAL WORKERCASE REPORT WITH AUTOPSY AND A BRIEF REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Medical Division Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1929;44(6):882-892. doi:10.1001/archinte.1929.00140060097011
Abstract

The classic picture of "diabète bronzé" is rarely seen in this clinic, in spite of the belief of Mallory1 that its fundamental pathologic background is not uncommon. Our interest was keen, therefore, when a man was admitted to the ward, not only presenting this condition in characteristic form, but also giving the remarkably apropos history that he had been a metal worker, in brass, steel and copper, for more than twenty years.

With the diagnosis practically "ready made" at the outset, we were able to plan and carry out fairly complete clinical and laboratory studies, which, together with autopsy observations, form the basis of this report.

Our purpose was: (1) to search for evidence of copper poisoning in relation to hemochromatosis; (2) to observe the effectiveness or noneffectiveness of insulin in controlling carbohydrate disturbances in a pancreatic disease known to be progressive and further complicated by liver disease, and (3)

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