[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 1930

PRIMARY CARCINOMA OF THE LUNGS WITH METASTASES TO THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Neuropathology Laboratory, Montefiore Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1930;46(4):680-704. doi:10.1001/archinte.1930.00140160130013
Abstract

Metastases of primary carcinoma of the lung to the central nervous system and other organs are not infrequent. Simpson,1 in a collection of 139 cases of patients who were admitted to the London Hospital between 1907 and 1925, and in whom primary carcinoma of the lung was found post mortem, stated that metastases were noted during life in about 25 per cent of the cases. Adler,2 in a collection of 327 cases, found only 33 cases in which there were no metastases. Frequently the metastases constitute the first sign of the disease, producing symptoms and signs in the organ involved, without any evidence of the primary site of the growth, thus leading to errors in diagnosis. Simpson,1 in the analysis of his cases, found 66 in which the condition was diagnosed incorrectly, and of these 18 were placed in the domain of diseases of the central nervous system in 31.4

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×