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Article
December 1930

THE REFLEX INFLUENCE OF THE COLON, APPENDIX AND GALLBLADDER ON THE STOMACH

Author Affiliations

IOWA CITY

From the Department of Internal Medicine, State University of Iowa.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1930;46(6):988-993. doi:10.1001/archinte.1930.00140180089008
Abstract

The present investigation was suggested by the study of the gastric manifestations associated with an irritable colon.1 The epigastric distress was demonstrated to be gastric in origin. It is intensified by an aggravation of the bowel symptoms, and may be induced by a distention of the colon. In the roentgen examination of the gastro-intestinal tract, a pyloric spasm was the most prominent observation. There was also frequently an increase in the peristaltic action of the stomach. These observations were not constant and varied in different persons, but they were more evident during periods of apparent increased tension in the colon. These observations suggested that an alteration in the tone, particularly in the pyloric region and in the peristaltic action, was responsible for the epigastric distress, and that the latter was induced by a stimulation from the colon.

Clinical and roentgen observations2 have strongly supported the theory of a reflex stimulation

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