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February 1931

THE COMPARATIVE CHANGES IN GASTRIC ACIDITY AND URINARY REACTION AFTER THE INJECTION OF HISTAMINE

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN

From the Gastro-Intestinal Department, Jewish Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1931;47(2):202-205. doi:10.1001/archinte.1931.00140200038004
Abstract

In a previous communication,1 we discussed the advantages of a test combining analysis of gastric contents with estimation of urinary acidity as a method of obtaining more controlled results in the determination of gastric acidity.

It has been known that persons having relatively normal gastric secretion are prone to have less acid urine after meals, a phenomenon commonly referred to as the "alkaline tide." On the other hand, a relative fixation of the urinary reaction has been shown to exist in patients with true achlorhydria. These observations were recently confirmed by Hubbard and his co-workers1a and by Baehr,2 Davis3 and others.

We decided to employ histamine as the gastric stimulant in our studies. Histamine has been recognized as the most reliable gastric stimulant for hydrochloric acid by numerous workers, particularly Andresen4 and Gompertz and Vorhaus.5 Ackman6 was particularly interested in studying the relationship between the gastric acidity and the

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