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Article
August 1931

THE RELATION BETWEEN THE SO-CALLED RENAL LESIONS OF PLASMAPHERESIS IN DOGS AND CONTRACTED KIDNEYS IN MAN

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Lasker Foundation for Medical Research and the Department of Medicine of the University of Chicago.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1931;48(2):286-300. doi:10.1001/archinte.1931.00150020117007
Abstract

HISTORICAL REVIEW  From time to time reports have appeared in medical scientific literature describing experimental renal lesions supposed to resemble the characteristic morphologic processes of Bright's disease as it occurs in man. The variety of ways in which renal lesions have been produced is all the more remarkable since few of the methods employed in the experimental studies are in any manner effective in, or relevant to, the natural course of chronic diseases of the kidneys seen in man. A review of these procedures was published in 1924.1It was soon recognized by competent pathologists that there were at least two significant errors in the interpretation of the experimental nephropathies. In the first place, "spontaneous" disease of the kidneys in the particular animals employed was either entirely overlooked or inadequate allowance was made for them. In the second place, and this, unfortunately, seems to be a reflection on the

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