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Article
December 1931

PRIMARY CARCINOMA OF THE LUNGSPATHOGNOMONIC SIGNS IN THE DIAGNOSIS

Author Affiliations

NEWARK, N. J.

From the Department of Medicine of the Newark Beth Israel Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1931;48(6):1126-1137. doi:10.1001/archinte.1931.00150070064005
Abstract

The diagnosis of carcinoma of the lungs still constitutes to the practicing physician a baffling situation with which he is inadequately prepared to grapple. The general practitioner must have, if he is to succeed diagnostically, some definite signs or a definitely pathognomonic symptom complex to go by: in meningitis, the headache, the Kernig sign and the rigidity of the neck; in pneumonia, the respiratory grunt and the peculiar disturbance in the pulse: respiration ratio; in typhoid, the leukopenia, the rose spots and the slow pulse. One can enumerate ever so many other conditions that have become diagnosable by the general practitioner because of the definite pathognomonic signs that they offer.

To these diagnosable conditions more and more disease entities are added as more and more pathognomonic signs and symptoms are elicited as time goes on. To the many conditions that as yet offer to the practitioner nothing fairly pathognomonic belongs

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