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December 1931

PIGMENT METABOLISM AND DESTRUCTION OF BLOOD IN ADDISON'S (PERNICIOUS) ANEMIA

Author Affiliations

TORONTO, CANADA

From the Department of Medicine and the Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, and the Medical Service, Toronto General Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1931;48(6):1156-1185. doi:10.1001/archinte.1931.00150070094007
Abstract

Since the employment of the liver treatment for pernicious anemia,1 defective formation rather than increased destruction of blood has been emphasized by Minot and Murphy,2 Peabody3 and others as the primary factor in causing the anemia. The chief evidence in support of this view is that the ingestion of adequate amounts of liver is followed in a few days by a sharp rise and fall in reticulocytes, and in a few months by a restoration of the blood picture to normal. Relatively little attention has been given, however, to the fact that within the same time all signs of increased blood destruction also disappear.

Although it has long been known that the excretion of urobilinogen in pernicious anemia is high, no quantitative studies have been reported of the change in the amount of urobilinogen in the feces and urine which follows liver therapy. The results of such

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