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Article
January 1932

USUAL AND UNUSUAL REACTIONS TO PROTEIN (FEVER) THERAPY

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Division of Medicine, the Mayo Clinic.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;49(1):1-25. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150080004001
Abstract

Shortly after Wright and others introduced specific vaccine therapy about twenty years ago, nonspecific vaccine therapy was introduced. This was soon followed by nonspecific protein therapy. Typhoid vaccine was first used intravenously by Kraus and Mazza1 in Argentina about 1912. Its use as a preventive of typhoid fever was first advocated by Ichikawa2 (1912), and it was first given intravenously as a nonspecific protein for "fever" therapy by Miller and Lusk3 in 1916 in the treatment for chronic infectious arthritis. It has since become one of the most widely used agents for protein or "fever" therapy, is employed for many diseases, particularly of the joints, skin and eyes, and as a substitute for malarial treatment in late syphilis. Recently it has been successfully used in the treatment for occlusive vascular disease4 and for evaluating, by means of the "vasomotor index" of Brown, the possibilities of sympathetic

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