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Article
February 1932

BLOOD SUGAR IN MAN FOLLOWING THE RECTAL ADMINISTRATION OF DEXTROSE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Physiology, Columbia University.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;49(2):221-226. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150090051006
Abstract

The dextrose retention enema is such a common clinical procedure, and the impression that considerable amounts of dextrose are absorbed after rectal administration is so well established in spite of the conflicting nature of the experimental data submitted in evidence that we considered the problem worthy of further investigation.

Clendening1 recommended such enemas, quoting Edsall to the effect that nine tenths of the carbohydrate injected is "taken up by the rectum." Sollmann2 stated that dextrose is "absorbed effectively from nutrient enemas." Lütje treated diabetic acidosis by rectal injections of sugar, and Joslin3 noted that as long ago as 1904, Arnheim reported that acetonuria of diabetic patients was diminished after the rectal administration of sugar solutions. Tallerman4 reported an elevation of the blood sugar curve in some of his cases. Carpenter5 stated that the absorption may be as much as 90 per cent of the dextrose

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