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Article
February 1932

THE EFFECT OF INSULIN THERAPY ON PANCREATIC ENZYMES IN MALNUTRITION

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Gastro-Intestinal Clinic, Out-Patient Department, Pennsylvania Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;49(2):330-342. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150090160016
Abstract

The present study was undertaken to discover whether insulin therapy, when applied to nondiabetic patients with malnutrition promotes the normal secretion of pancreatic enzymes and to prove thereby that the striking gains in weight in such a group may be attributed in part to an increased digestion and assimilation of aliment. Other investigators1 have shown that the ingestion of the same diet without insulin produced comparatively slight increase in weight. In the recent literature on carbohydrate metabolism,2 physiologists accept the fact that the hypoglycemia produced by the injection of insulin, and acting on the secretory and motor centers in the medulla, causes gastric and intestinal hypermotility, as well as pancreatic and biliary hypersecretion. The effect of the injection of insulin in augmenting the normal function of the tissues to hold water, carbohydrate, fat and protein is the fundamental criterion of insulin therapy and will be mentioned later in

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