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Article
March 1932

THE EFFECT OF PROLONGED DISTENTION OF THE STOMACH IN DOGS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Northwestern University Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;49(3):439-452. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150100096008
Abstract

The mechanism concerned in the production of acute dilatation of the stomach is not fully understood. Numerous theories have been advanced to account for it, but none has been entirely adequate. The reason is perhaps to be explained by the fact that this condition may be brought about in several different ways.

When first described by Brinton1 it was thought to be primarily a passive phenomenon of a purely paralytic nature. Conner2 stated: "The absence in almost all cases of obvious obstruction at the pylorus, and the fact that a similar paralytic distention of the intestines is a not uncommon phenomenon after abdominal operations and in peritonitis served to support this view as has also the experimental work of Carion and Hallion."3 The latter investigators said that "after resection of both nerves (vagi) above the diaphragm we have seen produced in the dog an enormous dilatation of

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