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Article
May 1932

CORRELATION OF LINGUAL CHANGES WITH OTHER CLINICAL DATA

Author Affiliations

MADISON, WIS.

From the Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;49(5):860-876. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150120150014
Abstract

The study of the tongue is as ancient as the practice of medicine. Hippocrates1 has left many notes of his observations of this organ. Repeated references in his clinical descriptions of the fevers are found to the tongue that is dry or parched. Sooty and dry is another qualifying expression used by Hippocrates relative to the tongue. Again he says, "If in a winter fever, the tongue be rough, and if there be swooning, it is likely to be the remission of the fever." An even more characteristic example is to be found in the following quotation: "When there is a chronic sore on the side of the tongue the surgeon should examine whether it be not occasioned by the sharp edge of a tooth." Through the generations down to the modern period of medicine the study of the tongue has been held in high esteem not only by

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